Tuesday, May 29, 2007

Preparing a Pineapple

Pineapples (Ananas comosus - hence the French call them (confusingly) ananas - in Spanish they are piña) from the Ivory Coast are selling at the moment for £1 or US2$ each in the UK. They should yield about 2 1/4 lbs ( 1 Kg in the civilised world) of juicy Vitamin C rich fruit.

Many folks feel daunted by preparing one.

1. Elect a nice firm fruit, if the leaves come off with a light tug showung a nice white base - with the effort say, you need to pull a ripe apple off the tree it's ready to eat.

2. If not ripe simply leave it on a sunny window ledge for a day or two.

3. You need a good strong sharp kitchen knife 10" 12" long and a chopping board.

4. Simply top and tail the fruit. You can amuse the kids by leaving the top in a saucer / bowl of water and it will continue to grow if left in a sunny position and can eventually be potted on when it starts showing roots.

5. Cut into 8 equal pieces with 4 straight strong strokes.

6. Taking each piece, with a single straight cut, remove the central stringy core - you can use this if you are going to make a smoothie.

7. Using the point of the knife cut the rind off each piece.

8. Segment into traingular shaped pieces.

Eat raw, with ice cream, cream, yoghurt, mix into a smoothie. we love sticking two wings into a corn muffin to make "angel wings" - if you eat one more you'll turn into a fairy.

Many folks use slices with ham, sweet and sour chicken, and (ugh) on pizza. (sick on a bun)

Because Pineapples contain a proteolytic enzyme bromelian, the juice can be used as a marinade and tenderizer for meat, it is for this reason that you cannot put it in gelatin jellies, they simply won't set.

This information sheet from Kew Botanical gardens, London will tell you more about Pineqpples than you probably want to know, their history, naming, agriculture etc.

—Post by Zizania